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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
, therefore, that will lead us in terms of price action over the next five days. bob pisani? >> if you look at the interday, we were positive on the day earlier on. we dropped in the middle of the day and some people are attributing this to concerns that the house leadership did not issue the 48 hour call for the whole house to come back into session and vote on a proposed plan even though there isn't one out there, some are interpreting this to mean there will be no deal certainly going into the weekend. of course, the time period on which we can do something now gets smaller and smaller. let me show you a couple sectors here. we talked about this mastercard report on sales only up 0.7%. luxury retailers getting hit hard. can i just point out that none of these luxury retailers have done very well this year. tiffany, coach, ralph lauren are negative on the year and have been even before today's report. michael kors is the standout in luxury. remember they went public about a year ago. that's had a great run, up about 60% this year. but that's the standout in retail. can i also point out th
to the circle o. oscar, joe branch's place. dave, bob benson's. that takes care of the ranchers. powder, take four or five of the boys into town. knock on all the doors. tell 'em what's busted loose. right. no, not connor. i want him and goss to come with us. - us? but i thought we-- - don't ask questions. fresno, you take the town. - now, let's get it straight, boys.
program. that record was later broken by whom? bob bark answer is, yes, bob barker, come on down. >> come on down. >> all right. bob is still cooking, right? >> he is. go neuter your animal. >> bill: question number two, early in her careers barbara walters was a today show today girl. female reporter weather entertainment and even advertisements. >> you know today's rising prices are enough to upset anyone's stomach. one of the most economical and effective ways to sooth it tv mm also served as towed girl early in her career? the answer is a, florence henderson. very good. it's a tie. okay. >> bill: question number in 150d the world. you let me into your homes to talk to you every day. beginning starting as a me to local reporter in what city? cards up, please, the answer is a, nashville. >> really? >> bill: yeah. where did i start? no one cares. not that they don't know. >> east sandwich. scranton, pennsylvania. >> to pica, kansas. >> bill: where did you start maccallum. >> here in new york city. >> bill: tough one. where else would i start? >> little market. 1992. what song did he use
minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. in this edition, we look at the life of tech titan steve jobs, the cofounder of apple, and we also examine the unexpected impact that one of his inventions, the ipad, is having on children and parents living with autism. in 2004, jobs asked walter isaacson, a former editor of time magazine, if he would write his biography. isaacson thought the request premature since jobs was still a young man. what he didn't know at the time, and only a few people did, was that jobs was about to undergo surgery for pancreatic cancer and was feeling his mortality. in 2009, with jobs already gravely ill, isaacson began the first of more than 40 interviews with him, the last being conducted a few weeks before his death. as steve kroft first reported in october 2011, the result was the best-selling book of the year. >> when walter isaacson first began working on the book-- which is published by simon & schuster, a division of cbs--steve jobs' wife, laurene powell, told him, "be honest with his failings as well as his strengths. there are parts of his life and his p
the price is right. no, not the game show with bob barker. i'm talking about the stocks. if you want to make money from your stocks, it's critical that i buy them at the right price. that's true whether you're making short-term trade or purchasing something that if everything goes right you expect to hold for years and years. the price still matters. when you pay too of for a stack, you make it vastly more difficult to rack up the kind of gains you and i want, the kind you can't get enough of here on "man money." if you get the price wrong, you my not make anything at all. so how do you find the best price to pull the trigger given how important i think it is? when you're investing for the long haul, you have one huge van, a resource traders don't have the luxury of exploiting. i'm talking about time. as the longer term investor, you've got all the time in the world. when you want to buy a stock because you like the underlying company's prospects and when there are no near term cat lists that could drive the shares up any time soon, that's a recipe for being patient. you doesn't have to pay
, kate jackson has that cute, little, short bob. and right now, still, today, a bob, like, for a woman in new york city, is almost like, she's more powerful, she's more sleek, she's fashion forward, she's sophisticated. - their full-bodied, ultra glam, hot-rolled curls sparked a revolution. - because of these shows, like "the bionic woman" and "charlie's angels," i knew how to use curlers, every kind of them. the foam curlers, the ones you plug in and they wrap around, the velcro rollers. i knew how to use all of those by fifth grade. - speaking of angels, on "highway to heaven," michael landon played one. - my pleasure! - he was on a mission from god, and with his trusted sidekick, traveled from town to town to help the lost find their way back to the "highway to heaven." so, naturally, he needed a hair halo. - now, michael landon had what i would call, like, a sex helmet. like, i would liken his hair to that, 'cause it's like, it didn't-didn't really move. it was just, there was so much hair, you know? it was like 90% of his whole body was hair, right? - you can't talk tv hair withou
presentation of the year on our quarterly project labor agreement report by bob beck. >> thank you, board members. bob beck with tjpa to give an update on the pla progress in the last quarter. last month we had our quarterly meeting with the trade unions. so this represents now one full-year since we first approved the pla. and we had updates on upcoming trade packages to make sure that the unions are informed of work that is coming down the pipeline. sorry, wrong mic. as well as reports on the progress that webcor has made in working with the veterans organizations in the bay area and we'll have ted wang from webcor come up and speak to that in a few minutes. as well as the work as the unions have done with tech 21 and local schools. so there has been a lot of good progress made on that front and there continues to be no work shortage issues or other impediments to our project. and we had no reportable incidents in safety in the last month. in terms of trade packages as you know at the last board meeting or the october board meeting we awarded the substructure package. $120 million on
. >> could you just ask bob, are we going to be able to start seeing trade by trade apprentice? >> we have that data now. >> at least for the bigger trades. i know for very small number it's hard to meet, but it would we good to get a sense of who is having more challenges. >> we can break that out, absolutely. >> thank you. >> good morning directors, steve with turner construction. another good period of work put in place these last -- this last month. let's see if question get we can get this going. 561,000 craft hours through the end of november/early december. a little more than 11,000 since we last spoke. the hours represent about 160-200 workers in the field on any given day across multiple shifts that we're running. and later in the report, there is a tally. that is over a thousand unique jobs during the transit center construction including utilities. so that is craft people, a thousand craft people having worked or touched this project as reported in the certified payroll system. the sc contractor made their milestone of 162 and actually completed 165 and is on track to f
, commissioners and happy holidays, bob palacio, san francisco recreation services. the item before you is a possible action item to retroactively accept a gift from the san francisco parks alliance in the amount of 65 thousand 205 dollars and 36 cents for the basketball program, just some background on the program, the association of basketball programs, anblp serves character treats ages 18 to 30, organized athletic activities, in this case basketball, educational and employment workshops and ancillary services and they work community responsibility and redirect energies towards positive goal setting and social goals, realization of these goals have stronger communities, they were led by the san francisco park and rec department, there were four divisions that were held this summer, we had a jr. division which is basically made up of teens and we have a young adults division and those both took place at both sites, we have a championship game as well, this is the current funder of this program or main funder of the program, that's how the 65 thousand dollars basically got to parks al
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
. you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit alka-seltzer on facebook. share brotherly love. share one up's. mom ? mom ? the share everything plan. lets your family share a pool of data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. now get a lucid by lg, free. has oat
, everybody, the best thing to watch this month, and bob pisani pointed this out. the transportation stocks have been very strong. china has been strong. mandy, you know, japan has been strong, and the banks have been strong. to me there's an underlying strength to the market when some of the bodyguards have been doing well so i think the market wants to do better. that having been said the fiscal cliff will turn out to be not a maxi deal but a mini deal and will clip the economy not by 1% but a 2% and a 60% chance something will get done but that's where we come out on it right now. a little bit harder hit to the economy. >> don't adjust your sets, everybody. this is what bob sounds like today. >> this is a different exchange here. >> not doing your imitation of david? >> what do you think that the seasonal factors are a major reason why the markets are holding up so well? if you look at the havens, gold, treasuries, for example, the dollar, there's no sign of panic in the haven. >> silver is down. you've seen a little bit of a lift in the vix, closer to 20. that's not bad, a normalization
affordable. if you think that bob krathit earns 15 schillings a week even someone as poor as him could afford to buy it in monthly parts. dickens knew how to manipulate an audience of one or an audience of 3,000 or 4,000 people. there were reports of people fainting at readings of the murder of nancy by sykes, people swooning at the parts of his readings. i mean that might have been just been the conditions in these venues where 3,000-4,000 people were gathered together to listen to him. but he certainly knew how to manipulate the emotions of a live audience. he was a consummate actor. dickens' relationship to the u.s. was very much a love/hate relationship, love before he came here quickly turning to hate after about three months. he came full of high ideals. he had been reading about america for a long time and looked upon america as a place that had thrown off all of the old problems of europe and britain. you know, the social system and those kinds of things that dickens felt really got in the way of business. when he got here, he was idolized straight off the ship. he was invited out to
determination. so will getting into college. i've got what it takes. so do you. ♪ . adam: i think bob dylan but i'm not sure that would date me, wouldn't it. yes it was bob dylan. now it could be the east coast and the gulf coast as well. the longshoreman's union is threatening to go on strike and analysts say it could be catastrophic for the fragile u.s. economy. 15 ports along the gulf and eastern seaboard could shut down in the next four days. as we speed toward the fiscal cliff, that is the last thing businesses nationwide need to threaten their bottom lines. here to explain what is at stake, jonathan gold, vice president of the national retail federation. thanks for joining us. last time we faced something like this, 2002, it took six months for u.s. economy to recover. the ports on the west coast were only closed for 10 is that accurate? >> adam, thanks very much for having me on. yes, the last time we had coast wide shut down was 2002. there was 10-day lockout. took six months to recover from. most economists say that lockout cost the u.s. economy about a billion dollars a day. adam:
. no reason given. they have hired them, which is another, hmm, wonder what they're up to kind of move. bob pisani is on the floor with what's moving today. >> we're up 24 points in the dow. and a lot of people think a grand bargain is impossible at this point. but president obama coming back from vacation in hawaii. that's an indication that some kind of deal -- however small -- is definitely coming. i want to point out, and i know you've been negative on this mastercard data on retail sales, and everybody thinks it's going to be a mess for the holiday season. i want to point out that the stocks are not acting that way. that this is a disaster for the season. the s&p retail index hit an historic high on december 3rd. historic high. since then, it has only been down about 3%. these stocks are not acting like there's a disaster. i can give you several reasons why they're not down so far. number one, we are going to see eps growth in the fourth quarter from some of them because of the extra week that there is. number two, we've had much lower cotton costs this year. their overall costs are lo
to statementp out bags, charge a buck. what are you doing nickel for? >> good guy. go senator bob smith. >> you never saw a new law you didn't love. >> that bitterness will make -- us. >> we have 5 cents on every piece of bacon, right? [laughter] that is all the money we have for you today. we will see you tomorrow. "the willis report" is next. stay classy, san diego. gerri: hello, everyone, i am gerri willis. retailers dealing with the fallout of shoppers not showing up this holiday season, dc starbucks store is urging lawmakers to come together tomorrow and friday. they will come back to work in a mighty more to to the point. the senate is back tomorrow morning. treasury secretary tim geithner is one congressional leaders about december 31. that's next monday, my friends, five short days from now. we have michael burgess of texas with us. i want to read you what the treasury secretary wrote to harry reid. he said i'm writing to inform you that the statutory debt limit will be reached on december 31. he went on to say that they have special gimmicks they are going to deploy to allow us to go p
yes, mad tweet tweets @jimcramer. hello, jim, writes bob, you often encourage home game force do their homework. although i dvr every episode of "mad money," i don't know what you suggest should be involved in doing our homework. my version is mostly listening to every word on "mad money" and checking price movements and charts. what else do you suggest? first of all, with "mad money," i wrote a whole book about what to did with "mad money." that's the starter. you hear a stock you like, you decide you want to get to know it. you go to the web site. the web site these days have almost everything. you read about the last few quarters. you know what i like, i like to read the annual report. then i like to call what the analysts are saying. i like to see what could be in the pipe, i like to see how the dividend is. these are all part of the process, long before i would ever think of pulling the trigger. i also like to think what would make me sell it. if they missed things or did certain thing and the stock went up high. a lot of homework, it all starts with the web site. here's one
on. >> because of what bob's saying is they're worried some voters are going to look at that -- >> unaware of reality that they would confuse this week with next week in terms of the same results. >> governor norquist agrees with you. but some republicans e spshlly in the house who are unwilling to make the plan "b" type deal. >> but in the end where do you think it's going to end up? 500,000? 600,000 $? >> it's going to be in the middle. closer to obama's $400,000. >> i think that's about right. sounds about like $400,000. >> which leaves out less than 2% of the people. >> absolutely. >> people say that's an average income. most people make about $40,000 a year. that's average. $40,000 and that's with three or four kids too. >> there's only a couple places in the country somebody would look at $400,000 and think it's extremely wealthy. >> even in washington, d.c. if you make $400,000 for a couple you're rich. >> this weekend the president's been a tough negotiator. as you said with republicans. i think he's been tough. the general reports about one meeting with boehn
barack obama has a chance to do what eric cantor told bob woodward after he met him the first time, which is if he's pragmatic, if he comes to the middle, then he could lock us republicans up for a very long time. i mean, i think that's the great challenge for barack obama. >> yeah. >> can he do what he appears to be doing right now with john boehner? and that is upsetting a lot of people in his own base for the betterment of their party by saying we're going to raise it from $250,000 to maybe $500,000, go after entitlements and do it for the best interests of the country. >> he is a pragmatist. the first two years, it was such a strained situation. when we talked to him on wednesday, everything he said was about -- he wasn't saying government has to be bigger. government has to be smarter. government has to be better. it was like the lincoln line. this is a fantastic picture, by the way. >> that is adorable. >> joe, that's one of the pictures i was talking about. >> you're letting us know, these are all exclusive to "morning joe." >> they're exclusive to "time" and "morning joe." apparen
mad twee tweets @jimcramer on twitter. hello, jim. writes bob in nevada. "you often encourage home gamers to do their homework. although i dvr every episode of "mad money" i don't recall specifying exactly what you suggest should be involved in doing our homework. my version is mostly libsing to every word on "mad money" and check price movement and arts charts. what else do you suggest we do?" here's what to do with "mad money." i wrote a whole book about how to do it with "mad money." that's the starter. you hear a stock that you like you decide you want to get to know it. you go to the website. the websites these days have almost everything. you read about the last three quarters. i like to read the annual report. then i like to call what the analysts are saying. i like to see what could be in the pipe. i like to see how the dividend is. these are all part of the process long before i would ever think of pulling the trigger. and by the way, i also like to think what would make me sell it? if they miss certain things or did certain things and the stock went up so high. a lot of t
we are heading in the same direction. thank you and have a wonderful new year. host: a tear from bob now in the democrat light. caller: thank you for letting me have a chance to speak. i am more optimistic -- i a more pessimistic than optimistic. i just do not think they will ever get together like they should. my one comment is when they start speaking about the cuts and the entitlements, the always a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here ou
and by the president. first of all, thank you, bob for that kind introduction. thanks for being so persist nt. i'm glad to have the chance now to come. in reflecting for my fair well address in the senate, i thought back to what motivated me to run for the united states senate. about 48 years ago i came to washington as a 16-year-old, sat in the gallery and watched a debate occur on civil rights. and i thought at the time some day i'd like to do that. i'd like to represent my state and i'd like to debate the great issues of the day. and after that trip i went home and i wrote on the back of an informal that i would run for the united states senate in 1986 or 1988 and i ran in 1986 and won what was considered to be the biggest political up senate north dakota history. so that is the power of a plan. and clearly our country now needs a plan. we need a fiscal plan. we need a plan that is going to bring us back from the brink because most economist tell us on our current course over the next several decades we will hit a debt that will be 230% of our gdp, clearly unsustainable. so we need a plan to get us
's a national treasure. >> he is, he is, indeed. bob, thank you so much for being with us. good to see you. >> good to see you, gregg. patti ann: well, all eyes are on the weather as we track that deadly storm heading north right now. we have a live report just three minutes away. gregg: and as violence escalates in syria, a top general reportedly switching sides. the turning point in the civil war? gregg: fox news alert, new watches in effect now for parts of the north and south carolina. all of this part of the deadly storm system that ripped through the south yesterday. let's go to maria molina in the fox extreme weather center. maria? >> reporter: that's right, our storm system still growing, yesterday produced over 30 reports of tornadoes across portions of the south, and today we're still seeing that risk in the form of damaging wind gusts and tornadoes. tornado watch in effect right now across eastern portions of the state of north carolina and also eastern portions of the state of south carolina. basically, what that mean bs is that conditions out here are ripe for these thundersto
... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> we're going to take a quick break now. we have the weekend box office winners all next. ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all on thinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ from td ameritrade. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. in the headlines, a new jersey pension fund is suing the new york stock exchange over a deal. carpenters says the deal undervalues the company, the second such transaction since last week. and samsung is embroiled with another patent dispute, this one not
or have differences. but they did keep each other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyone is going crazy and what robert byrd is doing even though they hate filibusters. one thing that
, defense secretary bob gates. but you did not have, again, your labor secretary. you didn't have your commerce secretary, your energy secretary. so he relied on sort of the people just around him. i think this administration and the president should do a better job of getting his cabinet out there, because, frankly, most americans don't even know who the rest of the cabinet members are. >> finer point on it, roland. do you think the president is sending a message that he won't fight for his nominees? >> well, i think what he's doing is, he's picking and choosing his battles, but he needs to understand, the last four years, republicans fought him on everything. he should send the signal, i'm not going to play the games we played the last four years. i'm going to be very aggressive, and if you want to deny me my choice, then you should vote that person down. he should have put her forward, and look, if he wants former senator chuck hagel, put him forward as well, and tell the senate, i dare you to do it. >> alice, that brings up an interesting point. tom friedman wrote an op-ed in "the
and keep your question as brief as you can. >> yes, bob with british medical journal. most of the talk it's been about impact on the federal budget and balancing one versus another. what analysis has been done on the exchanges, on the impact of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? by hypothesis would be that they would make them less employable in some ways. either that, or takes away from employers providing insurance. on the consumer side, how is it that these increased costs affect access to care and quality of care? >> paul, do you want to start the first part of that? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest that any of the medicare eligibility age would increase where employers would not offer coverage at all. for the vast majority of them, employers outside of industries where retiree health plans are highly concentrated, in fact the medicare eligibility age would be large in some employees would continue in the workforce longer because of the subsidies
, backwards! man: oh, don't... it went into bob and carol's yard. oh, no! ok, here it goes! man: oh, mom-sanity! announcer: challenge your kids to be active and eat healthy. all right, let's see what you can do. let's go. announcer: they might surprise you. search "we can" for more ideas on how you and your kids can get healthy together.
, little, short bob. and right now, still, today, a bob, like, for a woman in new york city, is almost like, she's more powerful, she's more sleek, she's fashion forward, she's sophisticated. - their full-bodied, ultra glam, hot-rolled curls sparked a revolution. - because of these shows, like "the bionic woman" and "charlie's angels," i knew how to use curlers, every kind of them. the foam curlers, the ones you plug in and they wrap around, the velcro rollers. i knew how to use all of those by fifth grade. - speaking of angels, on "highway to heaven," michael landon played one. - my pleasure! - he was on a mission from god, and with his trusted sidekick, traveled from town to town to help the lost find their way back to the "highway to heaven." so, naturally, he needed a hair halo. - now, michael landon had what i would call, like, a sex helmet. like, i would liken his hair to that, 'cause it's like, it didn't-didn't really move. it was just, there was so much hair, you know? it was like 90% of his whole body was hair, right? - you can't talk tv hair without a nod, or a bark... [barks] to
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)